Exploring the world and finding a new everything.
284 stories
·
45 followers

Smells like true love.

1 Comment and 3 Shares

card4957

Share and Enjoy:DiggStumbleUpondel.icio.usFacebookTwitterGoogle Bookmarks

The post Smells like true love. appeared first on Indexed.

Read the whole story
sredfern
117 days ago
reply
<3
Sydney Australia
Share this story
Delete

Appliances

5 Comments and 11 Shares

appliances

Read the whole story
minderella
210 days ago
reply
Don't even get me started on the clothes washer. That tramp!
wreichard
212 days ago
reply
It's better to burn out than to rust away.
Earth
HarlandCorbin
212 days ago
So, this is what happens to the blender lid. Maybe I should apologize to the kids...
wreichard
212 days ago
Heh!
sredfern
212 days ago
reply
This
Sydney Australia
popular
210 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
2 public comments
Romanikque
210 days ago
reply
Tom Waits is dying a little inside. Now we know why the Piano Has Been Drinking...
Baltimore, MD
KTamas
212 days ago
reply
😂
Budapest, Hungary

Aussie Pirate Bay Blocking Process Begins in Federal Court

1 Comment

stop-blockedIn common with other countries around the world, Australia envisions a multi-point process to tackle the issue of online piracy.

The first was a so-called “three strikes” warning scheme that would see regular Internet users monitored by anti-piracy companies and then sent escalating warning notices by their respective ISPs. After years in the planning the system was found to be too expensive and has now been shelved.

In parallel, copyright holders have sought to have pirate sites blocked at the ISP level and after new legislation was passed last year, the process was expected to become more streamlined. Today the first cases landed in Federal Court to test out the system for the first time.

Two industry players are leading the charge, with Roadshow Films (the movie division of Village Roadshow) and TV giant Foxtel both seeking to have several pirate sites blocked at the ISP level. The latter wants to render The Pirate Bay, Torrentz, isoHunt and TorrentHound inaccessible in Australia while the former is targeting streaming portal Solarmovie.

Perhaps needless to say, things haven’t been as straightforward as the entertainment companies might have liked.

Part of the blocking process requires that the copyright holders contact the sites in question to inform them that an application has been made. However, due to the existence of dozens of mirrors, clones and proxies (which only exist due to blocking action in other regions) that process has been both labored and fruitless.

Representing both Foxtel and Roadshow is veteran piracy case lawyer Richard Lancaster who also represented iiNet in the long-running and recently ended case against Dallas Buyers Club.

Lancaster told the Court that more than sixty sites need to be addressed to block the handful of key domains in the action yet only two-thirds of them have been reachable by letter. None of the sites responded.

“[For some of the sites] there’s no obvious or indeed unobvious mechanism for getting in touch with the operators of the sites, but we have sent notification letters out to 43 of the 61 domain names that have been identified in the pleadings,” he said.

Also at issue is proving to the Court that the sites being targeted have a primary purpose to infringe copyright. According to counsel for the applicants, that will be achieved by providing screenshots of each of the domains being targeted.

However, since there is zero chance of the owners of the sites turning up to defend themselves, there will be no adversarial process over what the Court is shown.

Furthermore, none of the 50 ISPs cited as parties in the case will mount a defense against the applications so barring any unforeseen circumstances the blocks will eventually become reality. Nevertheless, there are technical issues to be ironed out and some of those were aired in Court today.

For their part the ISPs would like to block the sites in question by interfering with their DNS systems but it appears that Foxtel and Roadshow Films would prefer the blocking of URLs and IP addresses. Additionally, Foxtel would like to add more IP addresses if sites seek to evade a block, which could be a problem with at least one ISP.

“We wish to seek to negotiate an arrangement for DNS blocking. If [Foxtel] were pushing for a broader blocking mechanism that might be an issue,” said counsel for Internet provider TPG.

While agreement will eventually be reached, both sides acknowledged the need for these first two cases to be dealt with in a manner that will build an efficient and cost-effective framework for future applications.

“This will be the first of several proceedings, and we really want to establish best practice from the outset,” counsel for ISP Optus said.

“We are concerned and ISPs are concerned that the orders in this case provide a template for the future,” Foxtel’s counsel added.

“We expect that will be done by careful consideration in the proceedings and by an eye for efficiency in future proceedings.”

The next date of note is May 6, when the copyright holders and ISPs return to Court having attempted to iron out their differences on the technicalities of blocking. That is surely only a matter of time and perseverance.

When the blocks are eventually put in place, future visitors to blocked sites will be greeted by a special landing page that will inform them of the existence of a court order. Those landing pages will be hosted by the studios so they will be able to track the number of visitors to the site and even their IP addresses.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and ANONYMOUS VPN services.

Read the whole story
sredfern
267 days ago
reply
lol this will do nothing
Sydney Australia
Share this story
Delete

Silicon Cowboys, a documentary film on the history of Compaq Computer

4 Shares

Silicon Cowboys

Silicon Cowboys is an upcoming documentary about Compaq Computer, one of the first companies to challenge IBM with a compatible computer.

Launched in 1982 by three friends in a Houston diner, Compaq Computer set out to build a portable PC to take on IBM, the world's most powerful tech company. Many had tried cloning the industry leader's code, only to be trounced by IBM and its high-priced lawyers. SILICON COWBOYS explores the remarkable David vs. Goliath story, and eventual demise, of Compaq, an unlikely upstart who altered the future of computing and helped shape the world as we know it today. Directed by Oscar(R)-nominated director Jason Cohen, the film offers a fresh look at the explosive rise of the 1980's PC industry and is a refreshing alternative to the familiar narratives of Jobs, Gates, and Zuckerberg.

There's no trailer yet, but the film is set to debut at SXSW in March. The first season of Halt and Catch Fire had a lot of influences, but the bare-bones story was that of Compaq.

Many reviews mention the similarity of the characters to Apple founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, but the trio of managers from Texas Instruments who left to form Compaq in the early 80s are a much closer fit. The Compaq Portable was the first 100% IBM compatible computer produced.

Tags: Compaq   computing   Halt and Catch Fire   IBM   movies   Silicon Cowboys   TV
Read the whole story
sredfern
293 days ago
reply
Sydney Australia
Share this story
Delete

Part 1: The Lull

1 Comment

The State of Speciality Coffee

Part 1: The Lull

This is the first of three parts, covering how I see the current state of the speciality coffee industry around the world. I’ve spent the last year thinking about this, and have had the chance to talk to people in the industry in cities around the world. I believe that much of what I’ll discuss has a global implication – even if not all of it is applicable to any one particular local market.

I’m aware that these posts come at strange time, as sentiment in the industry is generally incredibly positive. The SCAE recently ran a survey 1, and as part asked people about their feelings on the speciality market. 93.85% of those who responded felt positive about the current state, and 96.19% felt positive about the future. I sit in that very small minority on the latter, and I want to explain why. To do so I want to try and put my thinking into some sort of context covering how we got to where we are. This will, inevitably, be a little simplistic in places but I want to show my train of thought, see if you follow along and if we all end up in the same place.

The Rise of Speciality

I’m not going to talk in waves (because I believe it to be a good analogy, but US specific), so when talking about speciality in these posts I want to talk about the phase of modern coffee 2 that started in the early 2000s. Defined by a focus on the specific tastes of coffee, aiming to highlight the taste of terroir from which it came as well as the work of those who grew it.

This movement also drove a number of technological advancements in espresso and drip brewing (a sector of the industry that could be considered to be in a period of stagnation before this).

The goal was to produce the best tasting cup of coffee, the most transparent cup of coffee, and to share that with the consumer. The desire to surprise and delight them through the taste of the coffee was largely driven by the fact that those working in the industry had had revelatory moments: A cup of coffee that was shocking in its uniqueness and its taste. I think we believed that if we could only get consumers to taste really great coffee then they too would have a revelation, then they too would care deeply about the coffee they drink each day and ultimately would reward quality focused businesses with their loyal custom from that point onwards.

The rise of experimental coffee

I think this idea, this aspiration of selling revelation, can be seen throughout the tropes of the industry. Dairy and sugar became the enemy, as they would obscure the very thing we were so desperate to showcase and we quickly developed a reputation as condescending. Our clear frustration at people’s lack of interest in engaging intellectually with their coffee leaked out, coupled with our earnest desire to serve something truly unique, and slowly we became the new snobbery/hipster joke industry.

We designed and created businesses to try and showcase coffee in a new way. We built brew bars, we experimented with cafe layouts, we tried a raft of new things to try and build appreciation for great coffee.

We experimented with technology, chasing a cup of coffee that would somehow yield instant conversion. Pressure profiling, temperature profiling, unimodal grinding or unusual brewing technologies were all chased down and all had high hopes for producing something undeniably, irrefutably better. That search continues today.

You could well argue that, as an industry, we’ve been hugely successful. Speciality coffee has grown, in terms of total dollar value, at a startling rate. There isn’t a major city in the world lacking a cafe working hard to serve unique, traceable and interesting coffees. However, along with that there has been a phenomenon creeping in around the world that I think worthy of discussion…

The Lull

I don’t think I’m alone in feeling that the industry has begun to stagnate. The number of experimental, innovative or unusual coffee businesses opening has undeniably decreased dramatically. I also think that the general level of excitement about coffee is dropping.

When great coffee was rare, the knowledge of where to find it was valuable. It was prized. When travelling it seemed that when asking for recommendations you would get a few places repeatedly and emphatically suggested to you: “Going to New York? You have to go to Cafe Grumpy, or Ninth Street or RBC.”

There weren’t many places, but now that has changed. There is great coffee being served in lots of places, and even more aspiring to serve great coffee. As such giving and getting recommendations has actually gotten a lot harder. I travel, and ask, a lot and people seem increasingly reluctant to give a strong recommendation. Usually the first response I get is someone asking which neighbourhood of a city I’m giong to be in, followed by a local recommendation. Once again convenience rears its ugly head – the idea of a destination cafe seemed to burn brightly, but has perhaps sputtered out.

The knowledge of where to get great coffee is no longer valuable, because it is so readily available. Available as books, apps or maps. A higher standard of coffee is sufficiently easy to access that it could be considered, to some extent, normal. The problem with normal is that it isn’t exciting. It isn’t, and I hate to bring this up, particularly cool either.

Along the way we also did something important, but without the consequence we hoped for: we served some really, truly, great cups of coffee. The problem is that people simply enjoyed them and moved on. They were happy with their purchase, happy to be caffeinated, and happy to have paid what they did. The earth didn’t move, the sky didn’t part, they didn’t hear a choir of angels. I don’t believe coffee cannot, or should not be, improved; it can and should always get better. I think we just need to readjust our expectations of what an isolated sensory experience can do. Yes, sometimes it can change someone’s life. However, it can’t do it every time or even most of the time.

I believe we have made a grave mistake by allowing an idea to take root. We’ve sowed the seeds of an idea, the idea that: if you serve great coffee then that’s all you’ll need to be successful. I think we’ve stopped experimenting and attempting to innovate because we’ve worked out this truth – though we’re rarely at the point of discussing it openly.

Conversations in the industry are starting to change. The more experienced owners in coffee businesses have moved their focus away from how they can serve coffee that would delight their peers in the industry, into how they can run sustainable businesses. Conversations around equipment are clearly evident of this – people are interested in efficient, less wasteful technology and the idea of having to swallow high levels of coffee waste in order to achieve the best possible quality is dying a death.

I cannot attribute these changes in focus, this renewed interest in financial modelling, to just The Lull. There have been other important changes in the market that are having a much larger impact on the way people are thinking about their businesses, and this is what I’m going to address in the second part of this series tomorrow.

  1. http://scae.com/news-and-events/unification  ↩︎
  2. a phrase I’m stealing from Scott Rao  ↩︎
Read the whole story
sredfern
359 days ago
reply
Because I'm a coffee nerd
Sydney Australia
Share this story
Delete

To Hell

2 Comments and 3 Shares

to-hell

Read the whole story
sredfern
384 days ago
reply
Aww poor guy
Sydney Australia
Share this story
Delete
1 public comment
norb
383 days ago
reply
Lol
clmbs.oh
Next Page of Stories